Posts Tagged With: news

The Business of Free

freeth world free website design and other services

My original post can be found at http://freethworld.com/the-business-of-free/

The success of Google has transformed the economy of the world. In the 20th century the model of business remained largely unchanged. A business offered a product or service for a specific cost to the buyer. For the most part; the price of a product or service depended upon the amount of profit which could be earned above the cost of production and what customers would pay to keep a business alive.

Google changed that by offering their services to people for free. With Google, any person can search the wealth of information available on the internet, receive electronic mail, obtain phone service, and benefit from a tremendous range of other services – completely for free. Google is a company who transformed people; rather, users, into their product. Instead of selling a product or service to the consumer, Google sells the consumer’s information to the business.

Businesses became Google’s customers; offering a revolutionary method of targeting customers (users) with advertisements. Because their customers are businesses, and they offer services to consumers for free, Google has fashioned a model of providing valuable services without cost to the user of those services. This is a model which I hope yo enhance with an organization I have created called Freeth World.

I believe that success in life and business is all about relationships. Seeing ideas, projects, and solutions come to life is becoming less about what you know (although that is certainly important) as who you know and how we connect with each other – especially in the online information arena.

My intent by creating Freeth World is to build an organization that provides services, helping people build relationships both in the online world, and the natural world, completely for free. We will only accept donations in return for the services we provide.

Freeth world is an organization which builds relationships with our clients that are based not on the bottom line; or, money in return for services, but on trust. We trust our clients to exchange an amount they believe is fair, and which they can afford.

It is my hope that in using this model, we are able to provide useful and high quality services to any person and help others, regardless of their financial state, to achieve success. We believe that as we help our clients succeed, we will also succeed, creating a win-win professional relationships. We make our client’s success, our success as well.

Advertisements
Categories: Money & Resources, Writings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

When I See…

When I see foreclosed-empty homes, warehouses with “for rent” signs, and other vacant buildings, I see people laying on the streets in open doorways and sidewalks who have a roof for the night.

When I see barren land, I see bountiful gardens of food growing tall so that no person awakes tomorrow to wonder of where their next meal will come.

When I see people with disease, I see people coming around them to help receive the treatment they need and the best treatment of all – love and friendship.

When I see electricity, I see energy being produced from sources of wind, water, geo-thermal, and solar, sources which produce absolutely zero pollution to the air.

When I see a man on the street corner begging for change, I see a friend.

Categories: Money & Resources, Politics & Government, Writings | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

People Who Live Without Money. Yep, It Is Possible.

Mark Boyle

Mark-Boyle-aka-no-cash-ma-001
From an article in the guardian:

“I live without cash – and I manage just fine
Armed with a caravan, solar laptop and toothpaste made from washed-up cuttlefish bones, Mark Boyle gave up using cash.

In six years of studying economics, not once did I hear the word “ecology”. So if it hadn’t have been for the chance purchase of a video called Gandhi in the final term of my degree, I’d probably have ended up earning a fine living in a very respectable job persuading Indian farmers to go GM, or something useful like that. The little chap in the loincloth taught me one huge lesson – to be the change I wanted to see in the world. Trouble was, I had no idea back then what that change was.

After managing a couple of organic food companies made me realise that even “ethical business” would never be quite enough, an afternoon’s philosophising with a mate changed everything. We were looking at the world’s issues – environmental destruction, sweatshops, factory farms, wars over resources – and wondering which of them we should dedicate our lives to. But I realised that I was looking at the world in the same way a western medical practitioner looks at a patient, seeing symptoms and wondering how to firefight them, without any thought for their root cause. So I decided instead to become a social homeopath, a pro-activist, and to investigate the root cause of these symptoms.

One of the critical causes of those symptoms is the fact we no longer have to see the direct repercussions our purchases have on the people, environment and animals they affect. The degrees of separation between the consumer and the consumed have increased so much that we’re completely unaware of the levels of destruction and suffering embodied in the stuff we buy. The tool that has enabled this separation is money.

If we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today. If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior decor. If we had to clean our own drinking water, we probably wouldn’t contaminate it.

So to be the change I wanted to see in the world, it unfortunately meant I was going to have to give up cash, which I initially decided to do for a year. I got myself a caravan, parked it up on an organic farm where I was volunteering and kitted it out to be off-grid. Cooking would now be outside – rain or shine – on a rocket stove; mobile and laptop would be run off solar; I’d use wood I either coppiced or scavenged to heat my humble abode, and a compost loo for humanure.

Food was the next essential. There are four legs to the food-for-free table: foraging wild food, growing your own, bartering, and using waste grub, of which there is loads. On my first day, I fed 150 people a three-course meal with waste and foraged food. Most of the year, though, I ate my own crops.

To get around, I had a bike and trailer, and the 34-mile commute to the city doubled up as my gym subscription. For loo roll I’d relieve the local newsagents of its papers (I once wiped my arse with a story about myself); it’s not double-quilted, but I quickly got used to it. For toothpaste I used washed-up cuttlefish bone with wild fennel seeds, an oddity for a vegan.

What have I learned? That friendship, not money, is real security. That most western poverty is of the spiritual kind. That independence is really interdependence. And that if you don’t own a plasma screen TV, people think you’re an extremist.

People often ask me what I miss about my old world of lucre and business. Stress. Traffic jams. Bank statements. Utility bills.

Well, there was the odd pint of organic ale with my mates down the local.

• Mark Boyle is the founder of The Freeconomy Community. In a subsequent blog he responds to the comments below.”

Daniel Suelo

ht_daniel_suelo_nt_120503_wg
Article from details.com

Daniel Suelo lives in a cave. Unlike the average American—wallowing in credit-card debt, clinging to a mortgage, terrified of the next downsizing at the office—he isn’t worried about the economic crisis. That’s because he figured out that the best way to stay solvent is to never be solvent in the first place. Nine years ago, in the autumn of 2000, Suelo decided to stop using money. He just quit it, like a bad drug habit.

His dwelling, hidden high in a canyon lined with waterfalls, is an hour by foot from the desert town of Moab, Utah, where people who know him are of two minds: He’s either a latter-day prophet or an irredeemable hobo. Suelo’s blog, which he maintains free at the Moab Public Library, suggests that he’s both. “When I lived with money, I was always lacking,” he writes. “Money represents lack. Money represents things in the past (debt) and things in the future (credit), but money never represents what is present.”

On a warm day in early spring, I clamber along a set of red-rock cliffs to the mouth of his cave, where I find a note signed with a smiley face: CHRIS, FEEL FREE TO USE ANYTHING, EAT ANYTHING (NOTHING HERE IS MINE). From the outside, the place looks like a hollowed teardrop, about the size of an Amtrak bathroom, with enough space for a few pots that hang from the ceiling, a stove under a stone eave, big buckets full of beans and rice, a bed of blankets in the dirt, and not much else. Suelo’s been here for three years, and it smells like it.

Night falls, the stars wink, and after an hour, Suelo tramps up the cliff, mimicking a raven’s call—his salutation—a guttural, high-pitched caw. He’s lanky and tan; yesterday he rebuilt the entrance to his cave, hauling huge rocks to make a staircase. His hands are black with dirt, and his hair, which is going gray, looks like a bird’s nest, full of dust and twigs from scrambling in the underbrush on the canyon floor. Grinning, he presents the booty from one of his weekly rituals, scavenging on the streets of Moab: a wool hat and gloves, a winter jacket, and a white nylon belt, still wrapped in plastic, along with Carhartt pants and sandals, which he’s wearing. He’s also scrounged cans of tuna and turkey Spam and a honeycomb candle. All in all, a nice haul from the waste product of America. “You made it,” he says. I hand him a bag of apples and a block of cheese I bought at the supermarket, but the gift suddenly seems meager.

Suelo lights the candle and stokes a fire in the stove, which is an old blackened tin, the kind that Christmas cookies might come in. It’s hooked to a chain of soup cans segmented like a caterpillar and fitted to a hole in the rock. Soon smoke billows into the night and the cave is warm. I think of how John the Baptist survived on honey and locusts in the desert. Suelo, who keeps a copy of the Bible for bedtime reading, is satisfied with a few grasshoppers fried in his skillet.

Read More About Daniel Here

Heidemarie Schwermer

04_heidemarie_s_web2-e1289946685112
Article from BusinessInsider.com:

In her early 50s, Schwermer decided to see what it’d be like to leave her cushy job as a psychotherapist and live money-free, a journey that’s been documented in the film “Living Without Money.”
Sixteen years later, she hasn’t looked back. Schwermer, now pushing 70, recently took a pause during her stay in Hamelin, Germany to chat with Business Insider about why she decided to leave everything behind.

WWII refugees, Schwermer’s family fled from Prussia to Germany in the 1940s. Her father had owned a successful coffee roastery and kept a nanny and full-time gardener on his payroll. “We were well-off but ended up as riff-raff,” she says. “Then we became rich again and (we) had to defend it. I’ve always had to justify myself, whether we were rich or poor.”

Throughout her life, she became fascinated with finding ways to live without money. A former teacher and psychotherapist, Schwermer formed Germany’s first exchange circle, “Give And Take Central” in 1994. The group helped locals exchange simple services like babysitting or house cleaning for tangible goods. “I noticed that I needed money less and less,” she told Business Insider. “And so I thought, I can try to live one year without money.”

Schwermer attempted to live without money at least four times, she says, but it wasn’t until a friend asked her to house sit for three months that she finally took the plunge. “I said, ‘The time is right. Now I’ll do it.’ I gave everything away.” That included her apartment, which she sold first, and everything that wouldn’t fit into a small suitcase.

What was only meant to last 12 months became her life for the next 16 years. “I only wanted to try to do an experiment and in that year, I noticed a new life,” she said. “I didn’t want to go back to the old life.”

Family and friends weren’t on board when she pitched the idea. She only sees her two children and three grandchildren a few times per year, but says they’ve warmed up to her come-and-go lifestyle. “Now they’re proud of what I’m doing. It’s enough for us,” she says.

After divorcing her first and only husband 40 years ago, Schwermer hasn’t re-married. She’s clearly not in any rush. “If it happens, I’m interested, yes,” she says. “Sometimes it does. Sometimes it doesn’t.”

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/heidemarie-schwermer-has-lived-without-money-for-16-years-2012-6?op=1#ixzz2J8pzM2dt

Categories: Money & Resources, Writings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Property of Ownership, Africa Land Grabs, and Injustic

I would like, for a moment, to write about the property of ownership. Is the belief that we have ownership over a section of land, building(s), automobiles, and other items, man-made or not, a healthy thing for humanity?

The danger with ownership is that we believe we possess something, but that some-thing also possesses us, many times to our demise. One of the contributing factors to the depletion of many African resources and land, came when the white men discovered they had no law which said they owned their land. They simply lived on the land, farmed for food, and lived a quite communal lifestyle, free of laws. Well, because they had no law, the English decided to make their own, stating that where law did not exist, that land was under the law of Britain, and was free-game for the whites to conquer and claim as their own.

This process of “land grabbing” is continuing to this day. Here is some information about the issue from www.stopafricalandgrab.com:

“Land grabbing is the contentious issue of large-scale land acquisitions; the buying or leasing of large pieces of land in developing countries, by domestic and transnational companies, governments, and individuals. While used broadly throughout history, land grabbing as used today primarily refers to large-scale land acquisitions following the 2007-2008 world food price crisis. By prompting food security fears within the developed world and newfound economic opportunities for agricultural investors and speculators, the food price crisis caused a dramatic spike in large-scale agricultural investments, primarily foreign, in the Global South for the purposes of food and biofuels production. Initially hailed by investors and some developing countries as a new pathway towards agricultural development, investment in land has recently been criticized by a number of civil society, governmental, and multinational actors for the various negative impacts that it has had on local communities.
The target locations of most land grabs are in the Global South, with 70% of land grabs concentrated in Sub-Saharan Africa. Other primary areas of note are in Southeast Asia and Latin America.”

I will write more on this subject at a later time… stay tuned and please feel free to comment leaving your thoughts below.

Categories: Money & Resources, Politics & Government, Religion & Philosophy, Writings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Giving Changes The World

We are trained at an early age to believe in the philosophy of “survival of the fittest.” We are taught to do our best in taking care of our-self, to rely only on our-self, to become successful in life and business.

Because of this indoctrination – “survival of the fittest” – our behavior is shaped toward gaining as much as possible to provide for our own well being; our own security. But what if we inverted this thinking? What if we began first with the principle of giving, rather than gaining? I propose that if our focus is on gaining so that we might give, our capacity to give will be restricted as it is not truly our priority, and thus may never be realized. Because our first focus is to gain for ourselves, we continue a path of accumulation and giving becomes of greater difficulty, the more we accumulate.

We accumulate more and more, but it is difficult to shift our focus toward giving after years spent in pursuit of personal gain.

So what if we begin with our focus on giving? Do we sacrifice gain? I believe the answer to this question is absolutely, no.

When we give of ourselves to others; our time, our resources, and our friendship, we gain value that is priceless in the hearts and minds of people in need of hope. And hope is a force which can change the world.

Categories: Money & Resources, Writings | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Poverty: The Greatest Crime of Humanity

We are told that poverty is a natural part of our world. We are told poverty will always exist. But my vision for life, our world, and our species call humanity, begins from a place of highest truth. Some call this place heaven, God, enlightenment, nirvana, and a slew of other terms which people throughout history have attributed to this place of peace and bliss.

I believe in the existence of this metaphysical reality, not in terms of an afterlife (nor do I disbelieve in an afterlife), but in terms of a well from which truth is drawn into the physical world. And if truth may be drawn from this realm of peace, are there any limitations on how much truth we may be able to drink and see evidenced in the earth? I believe not.

Let us consider the spiritual aspects which I believe exist in the realm of truth: peace, freedom, giving, compassion, joy, bliss, and contentment. All aspects of truth are found in the source of all things which is love. All aforementioned aspects occur from a place of simple love for one another. Love for all people and love for all of life. Can we say these words of love; peace and joy, are things which can be physically witnessed? Do we not call a tree a “tree” and a house a “house”? The words of love therefore are describing that which cannot be seen by the physical eye, but requires us to use imagination, faith, and the eye of our own heart.

We know the reality within words of love in many forms. We understand compassion when one gives of themselves for another’s well being. We are told that compassion is unnatural, however this is quite simply a lie which has become reality as it has been believed. Compassion, when known, becomes a most natural practice as it arises from our true human nature. It is believed by many that our nature is bent toward greed or “sin” as some call it, but we must reconnect with who we truly are, who we were at birth.

To know God is to understand ourselves. If we know God to be hateful, we will believe ourselves to be hateful. If we know God to be a liar, we will believe ourselves a liar. Many attempt to separate themselves from God, believing that God is good, yet we are bad. But to believe that would be to believe that a good creator would create something bad. The words of love, I believe are all that are worth attributing to God in the reality of which we live.
How do we reconnect with our true nature?

Re-connection to our true nature begins with the understanding that all questions are not only permissible, but necessary for understanding truth. Absolute truth is not found within a given answer, but in the questions we examine. When answers to questions are received they are not “end points” to our search for truth in a given subject, rather; they bring us to a new level of greater questions.

Categories: Money & Resources, Writings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Solutions to Change the World

I’ve discovered five key solutions to share with the world to eliminate our problems of violence, fear, poverty, slavery, and hate.

1. Peace: Human history has always known war and violence toward one another. Because of this history we have accepted as fact that humanity will always be at war. However, I believe that peace will one day be known by our species, and I will work to that end, whether it be one or one-thoiuand years from now to be realized. I believe our faith can ony be realized as truth if we place it in that which has not yet been seen. And the truth of a world at peace, is the only truth befitting a God who is love.

2. Hope: It is often that I hear “hope” spoken of in a depresding manner. We hear people say “I hope so” commonly with a tone of belief that what we hope for likely will not happen. But I would offer that the only things we should have hope for are those things which there is no doubt we will achieve. I hope in peace, and a world filled with people who simply love one another, share resources, and bring freedom to all of life. These are dreams of mine which I believe to based in promises from a being who cannot lie – God.

3. Resourceful Giving: Poverty is a product of greed. Greed is humanity’s pursuit of power over another, as opposed to service to one another. As we learn the joy of giving we learn that giving is actually one of the most selfish acts we can do. Because giving not only improves the well being of another in need, but improves the well being of our world. When poverty is eliminated by a gift of fortune, the incentive for thousands of other problems is also eliminated, and we create a safer, more connected in relationship world.

4. Freedom: Liberty is one of life’s most badic rights. Freedom is at war with greed & humanity’s desire to rule others. For freedom to be realized we must stand against those who would seek to oppress and enslave others. We stand against oppresdion with weapons not of violence nor words of anger; but with a heart of love and justice.

5. Love: I believe every solution listed above is rooted on simple love for one another. As we, together in unity, learn more about what “loving one another” means, the world will know peace, hope, generosity, and freedom.

Categories: Religion & Philosophy, Writings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Big Sur, California, A Mustang Convertible, and Two Young Women

bigsur
This morning I was in Monterey, California and chose to go to Big Sur. After spending the previous two nights at an open 24 hours Denny’s, sleeping for about 30 minutes on the beach of Monterrey, and being heavily caffeinated on Starbucks and Denny’s coffee, I needed a change in scenery.

I found the first bus leaving Monterrey headed south to Big Sur, and used my dwindling $4 for the ride (I now had about $5 left in total). If you’ve never heard of Big Sur, I suggest you search through images of Big Sur on Google. From all of my hiking up and down the west coast, Big Sur was certainly the most spectacular sight to behold.

big-sur

I had been hiking through Big Sur for about 2 or 3 hours, when I came to a place of road construction. Because the road was closed to one lane, it made it impossible for me to continue hiking while cars were passing through. I stopped to wait. I was standing beside the road, when a streak of blue passed by with two young women in their mid-twenties. As they drove next to me, in their brand new Mustang, the young lady in the passenger yelld “Ya wanna hop in?”

My choice was obvious. I ran to catch up with them, literally “hopped in”, and we drove around the windy roads of magnificient Big Sur.

img_4649

Like myself, the kind young women who had offered a ride to me didn’t have much of a plan. Eventually, they would make it to Los Angeles, hopefully before that evening to go to a concert in Long Beach. After asking me a couple of times if I were a serial killer, they offered for me to ride the entire way to LA with them, if I would like. Since I always like to go with the flow, that seemed to be where the flow was going.

Categories: Exploration News, Stories | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What Happens in the Unknown? Hiking Oregon.

astoria

Over the past few years I’ve taken many trips “into the unknown.” What I mean is, I’ve started a journey, traveling from place to place without destination, without much money, and without knowledge of how I would survive.

I always remember the first step, which is often that hardest to take. Each time I take that step, fully realizing I have just crossed over from everything I knew, into everything I did not know. This step then begins a battle between excitement and fear, and though fear may appear more prevalent at times, excitement and sureness have always won.

It’s incredible what God can do when we step into the world of the unknown. A world where He is completely our total reliance. I remember walking along highway 101 in northern Oregon one evening, the sun was moments away from giving way to darkness. I had about $8 to my name and it looked I would be walking another 6 or 7 hours until approaching the next town of Astoria. Right at the time a truck pulled over and asked if I’d like a ride into Astoria – perfect timing.

I arrived in Astoria at about 9pm, still without a clue as to how or where I would sleep. When someone from Astoria has told me about a place that was “a step below a hostel and a step above a homeless shelter.” It sounded perfect to me. They gave me directions and I pursued to find the establishment where I might sleep for the evening. When I found the building I spoke with some gentleman outside who said I’d found the place, but I’d have to speak to the house manager about staying for the night. Luckily they said, he was there, finishing up a Bible study. I walked through the front door, made my introduction, and secured a couch for the nigh, before heading to Portland in the morning.

That is just one story, from the many cases on my two month long Explroation of the west coast, this past summer, where nothing seemed to be coming to my aid, in a time of seemingly distress. Yet I never felt incredibly stressed. There were moments of fear, but they were brief. I continuously practiced the thought in my head that “I’m doing great!” I wasn’t hungry, I had water, I had clothing, and if need be I would find somewhere to sleep at some point.

Why should I fear the world around me?

Categories: Exploration News, Stories | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Night One: LAX

los angeles airport
Night One:
This past summer I spent two months on the west coast of the USA. I traveled those two months from Los Angeles to the northern Oregon border and back to LA, on a journey that would see many new relationships found, precious moments shared, and an adventure of a lifetime. Luckily for me, adventures of a lifetime are one thing of which I am a wealthy man. I flew to LA from my hometown of Oklahoma City with a one-way plane ticket I managed to land for only $85. The extent of my plan being to land in LA at around 11:15, find a bench in the airport to close my eyes through the dark of night, and begin my journey of the west coast at sunrise. That first night saw no sleep. I layed beneath some chairs in the corner of an airdock waiting room; nearby where some kids apparently in high school were conversing about the three songs which continuously repeated over the airport speakers. Where were they going? Why were these “kids” in an airport at 2 in the morning? These questions would go unanswered. I checked the sunrise time for LA that morning and decided I would go outside about 30 minutes before liftoff! My first steps outside of the airport brought me in front of a bench occupied by two security guards, lending their heroine protection to the airport guests. What painstaking work it must be to secure an airport at 4am with 4 guests who inhabit an airport at that time. I’m curious if cigarettes are provided to give security guards enough activity at that time? Anyways; I gave a moment to thought of my direction on which to embark… North.

Categories: Exploration News, Stories | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: